deadcantdraw

A weird thing I find incredibly helpful for art/writing.

deadcantdraw:

Eplans.com is a website that sells blueprints for houses. 

This might not seem that helpful but if you want a characters house you can make selections based on what sort of house you want them to live in. 

image

Then browse through the results and find the house you want. Then you can view the blueprints and have a room layout for that house, which can help with visualising the space they live in. 

image

It makes describing generic homes so much easier.

writeworld

How to Edit Your Own Writing

writeworld:

How to Edit Your Own Writing

by Caroline McMillan

Like most newspaper reporters, I got into the biz because a) I love writing and b) I’m pretty good at it. But it’s a sobering profession. You file your masterpiece, only to find your editor thinks it’s two dozen “tinks” shy of publishable. Repeat this scenario a couple hundred times, and you’ll find you’ve grown some thick skin. You’ve also gotten pretty darn good at self-editing. So, I’m here to impart some wisdom on the art of quickly perfecting your own work—how to hone, trim, and morph clumsy words and phrases into a clear, concise message that will wow your audience.

It could be a company memo, a PowerPoint presentation, an email, or a report—but no matter the medium, these quick editing skills will always come in handy. Some other bonuses of good self-editing skills: People are less likely to misunderstand you, and bosses and peers will pay more attention to the meat of your message.

So here we go. Let’s say you’re working on a personal assessment for your annual performance review. You’ve written the first draft, but you want to make sure it’s in perfect condition before you submit it. Here’s your game plan:

Read More

amandaonwriting
amandaonwriting:

Four Types of Book Editing
1. Developmental Editing
Any or all of the following:
Working with the client and, usually, the author of a book or other document to develop a manuscript from initial concept, outline, or draft (or some combination of the three) through any number of subsequent drafts
making suggestions about content, organization, and presentation, based on analysis of competing works, comments of expert reviewers, the client’s market analysis, and other appropriate references
rewriting, writing, and researching, as needed, and sometimes suggesting topics or providing information about topics for consideration of authors and client.
2. Substantive Editing
Improving a manuscript in any or all of the following ways:
identifying and solving problems of overall clarity or accuracy
reorganizing paragraphs, sections, or chapters to improve the order in which the text is presented
writing or rewriting segments of text to improve readability and flow of information
revising any or all aspects of the text to improve its presentation
consulting with others about issues of concern
incorporating responses to queries and suggestions creating a new draft of the document
3. Copy Editing (sometimes called line editing).
Any or all of the following:
correcting spelling, grammar, punctuation, syntax, and word usage while preserving the meaning and voice of the original text
checking for or imposing a consistent style and format
preparing a style sheet that documents style and format
reading for overall clarity and sense on behalf of the prospective audience
querying the appropriate party about apparent errors or inconsistencies
noting permissions needed to publish copyrighted material 
preparing a manuscript for the next stage of the publication process
cross-checking references, art, figures, tables, equations, and other features for consistency with their mentions in the text
4. Proofreading. Comparing the latest stage of text with the preceding stage, marking discrepancies in text, and, when appropriate, checking for problems in page makeup, layout, color separation, or type.
Proofreading may also include one or more of the following:
checking proof against typesetting specifications
querying or correcting errors or inconsistencies that may have escaped an editor or writer
reading for typographical errors or for sense without reading against copy
Definitions from Freelance Editorial Association
From Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Four Types of Book Editing

1. Developmental Editing

Any or all of the following:

  • Working with the client and, usually, the author of a book or other document to develop a manuscript from initial concept, outline, or draft (or some combination of the three) through any number of subsequent drafts
  • making suggestions about content, organization, and presentation, based on analysis of competing works, comments of expert reviewers, the client’s market analysis, and other appropriate references
  • rewriting, writing, and researching, as needed, and sometimes suggesting topics or providing information about topics for consideration of authors and client.

2. Substantive Editing

Improving a manuscript in any or all of the following ways:

  • identifying and solving problems of overall clarity or accuracy
  • reorganizing paragraphs, sections, or chapters to improve the order in which the text is presented
  • writing or rewriting segments of text to improve readability and flow of information
  • revising any or all aspects of the text to improve its presentation
  • consulting with others about issues of concern
  • incorporating responses to queries and suggestions creating a new draft of the document

3. Copy Editing (sometimes called line editing).

Any or all of the following:

  • correcting spelling, grammar, punctuation, syntax, and word usage while preserving the meaning and voice of the original text
  • checking for or imposing a consistent style and format
  • preparing a style sheet that documents style and format
  • reading for overall clarity and sense on behalf of the prospective audience
  • querying the appropriate party about apparent errors or inconsistencies
  • noting permissions needed to publish copyrighted material 
  • preparing a manuscript for the next stage of the publication process
  • cross-checking references, art, figures, tables, equations, and other features for consistency with their mentions in the text

4. Proofreading. Comparing the latest stage of text with the preceding stage, marking discrepancies in text, and, when appropriate, checking for problems in page makeup, layout, color separation, or type.

Proofreading may also include one or more of the following:

  • checking proof against typesetting specifications
  • querying or correcting errors or inconsistencies that may have escaped an editor or writer
  • reading for typographical errors or for sense without reading against copy

Definitions from Freelance Editorial Association

From Writers Write

writeworld

Writing Tips 108: Six Tips for Writing Descriptions

bookgeekconfessions:

image

Six Quick Tips for Writing Descriptions

  1. Close your eyes and try to recreate the image in your head.
  2. Remember that people have five senses. Don’t just rely on visual description.
  3. Adjectives should describe, not evaluate. Describing skin as smooth or tan is better than describing it as pretty or perfect.
  4. Don’t over-describe things. A description should enhance the story, not drag it to a stop.
  5. Don’t describe things that don’t matter. If you spend a paragraph discussing a minor character’s mustache-grooming ritual, it had better be important to your story.
  6. Draw your descriptions from real-life memories.
the-right-writing

How to get writing done

the-right-writing:

  • Wake up
  • Do your morning chores
  • Open your computer
  • Squint so you can barely see the screen and press or click the button (depending on the type of computer) that turns the internet off
  • Open your eyes fully again. Congratulations, you were able to resist talking to people or going on Tumblr! Now it will be harder to do so because your internet is off. You will hopefully be consumed by fiery guilt if you go to press that button without writing something first!
  • Write
  • Turn it back on once you’re satisfied with how much you’ve written